The Right Background

Until recently I have not been big on backgrounds!

Also, very rarely have I used colored paper preferring to keep things simple!

That was until I was given some A4 black paper. The first sheet was used to draw a deer using just a white pencil and occasionally a black pencil to go over areas where I was perhaps a bit too enthusiastic with the white!

I enjoyed the simplicity of the process.

Portrait of a Deer using a white pencil on black paper
Portrait of a Deer using a white pencil on black paper

Then after that positive result I plucked up the courage to use some anthracite colored pastel mat for the Tawny Owl. The dark color as well as reflecting the nocturnal nature of the bird certainly creates impact that a white background fails to do.

Having been pleased with the results of using a dark color, I have now started on a Barn Owl using the same anthracite colored paper …although looking at the images below you would not think that!

The Tawny Owl is nearly finished but the Barn Owl has still got quite a bit of work to do before he is finished.

Work in progress of a Barn Owl and a Tawny Owl
Work in progress of a Barn Owl and a Tawny Owl

One drawing that I did finish recently was this Badger… I wonder what impact a dark color would have had on him!

Portrait of a Badger
Portrait of a Badger

Too late unless I decide to draw him again… which I probably will at some point but in the meantime he will be my next study using mainly a white pencil on black paper!

Spring Gallery

Now into the fourth month of a new year it is time to take stock of what I have completed this year.

There were a couple of wolf studies. The head portrait I would describe as my favorite.

A wolf collage consisting of a head portrait and a snoozing wolf.
A wolf collage consisting of a head portrait and a snoozing wolf.

A large amount of time was also spent on the big cats study that started with charcoal drawings and then progressed on to color drawings. I have no favorite as they are all different.

A Collage of four big cats rendered in charcoal and in colour pencil.
A Collage of four big cats rendered in charcoal and in colour pencil.

Lately I have concentrated on wildlife local to me. The latest piece to be finished is the roe deer. Again I find it hard to choose a favorite.

A collage consisting of a roe deer, red squirrel, red fox, and a hare
A collage consisting of a roe deer, red squirrel, red fox, and a hare

Still got drawings to finish such as the Pine Marten and the Orangutan. I will not rush them but I may need to revisit the Pine Marten. He is not turning out the way I would like!

Nearly Finished

It has been a busy week full of distractions but nearly finished my latest drawings of a Pine Marten and a Roe Deer.

Work in progress of a Pine Marten
Work in progress of a Pine Marten

The pine marten still has a lot of work required around the head and on the log.

Work in progress of a Roe Deer
Work in progress of a Roe Deer

The Roe Deer still requires a lot of work around the ear and the head.

I will keep rotating between the two until they are finished

Concentrating on the Native

The grey squirrel and the red squirrel

Time to start planning new projects. I am concentrating on the native for a bit!

While projects with an international wildlife theme are extremely good to do, it is important not to neglect what is local. Unfortunately people can sometimes be more familiar with the issues facing lions, tigers, giraffes, wolves and rhinos and be totally unaware of the issues that affect their local wildlife.

An example of such an issue relates to squirrels. Locally there is a very healthy population of American Grey Squirrels but unfortunately where I live in Scotland, they are not native. The native squirrel is the red squirrel. This is smaller and has been under immense pressure ever since the introduction of the bigger grey squirrel. Currently red squirrels are now only confined to a handful of areas.

The grey squirrel and the red squirrel
The grey squirrel and the red squirrel

While grey squirrels can be fun to watch out in the local woods, I have to confess I would rather see our native red squirrels. Therefore it is vitally important to raise awareness of how the introduction of the grey  has had such a negative impact on our native red populations.

Another issue that I think is quite sad is how remarkably unobservant many people are.  I remember while out walking the dog,  watching people make their way along a path to get to work…  just a short distance up the hill stood three roe deer quietly munching away.

Portrait of Roe Deer- work in progress
Portrait of Roe Deer- work in progress

The deer just seemed to know that the chances of people seeing them was very low.

I always wondered what the reaction of those people would have been if they had just turned their head to the left and saw how close the deer were!

Maybe you would argue that it is a good thing that most people are oblivious! After all, it  could lead to the deer facing greater disturbance.

While that is certainly a risk… I think it is one that is worth taking.  Being the optimistic person that I am, my view is that the more people who are aware of the presence of the deer the more likely they are to value  and care for that area.

Going back to the point I made earlier about people not recognizing  the animals that live in their own country… here is one example… this is the Pine Marten. Well Pine Marten under construction!

Portrait of a Pine Marten- Work in progress
Portrait of a Pine Marten- Work in progress

I wonder if people would recognize this animal as being native to Scotland.

It is a forest dweller that is unfortunately confined to the North of the Country. This gorgeous member of the weasel family has been in decline but thankfully numbers are now rising.

These new drawings of a Pine Marten and a Roe Deer once finished will be added to my gallery of local wildlife. My intention will be to make prints from the originals and use the illustrations as a means of provoking discussion about wildlife issues.

This concentration on local  wildlife will not be to the neglect of international issues.

It is my view that by by raising  awareness of what is happening locally  on the doorstep, it can not only foster an interest… but also provoke a call to action . As people become more involved with the local…  hopefully they will start to identify the connections with the global.

Migrating birds demonstrate this perfectly. People tend to like birds and welcome the return of swallows and swifts. But, for these birds to survive they need to have good habitat not only at both ends of the journey but also on the stop over areas in between. Migrating birds would be a good subject to draw in the future.

All too often people are sympathetic to international causes but their distance creates a remoteness and a feeling of powerlessness. By valuing the local hopefully they will make the connection and support the global too!